Trend Alert: Dark-Paned Windows

dream house: the front door.
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Black-paned windows are IN! Just a little touch of dark paint can add serious drama and style to your space or home. Whether you’re looking for something modern and show-stopping or traditional and elegant, black-paned windows can be a great addition to your space.

The reasons for their popularity are ten-fold. Black is a “forgiving color,” hiding dirt and blemishes, and can be styled with pretty much any other color. Think classic black suit, but on your walls. Unlike white, which can sometimes steal the show in a design, black doesn’t compete as much for visual attention. It can be as much at-home in a Victorian mansion as a mid-century house. 

It pays to be aware of one potential downside to black window frames: heat absorption. If you’re adding them to a west-facing window, these frames have the potential to raise the temperature of the room significantly, especially during the summer. Of course, this is an upside during the winter! You can have a warmer room without resorting to running the heater at full-blast. 

Take a look at some of these great, dark-paned window looks. 

20 Examples Of Minimal Interior Design
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oak floors, tufted leather seating + industrial black window panes...
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Light wood color and black window casing
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black + grey kitchen w/ factory windows [loft cinderela by Brazilian architects AR Arquitetos]
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www.jeffreydungan.com In the depths of winter, I learned that there was inside me- an invincible summer... Albert Camus (On days like today- when even in the 'Deep South' it's a balmy 16 degrees- I like to remember Camus sage words... and a warm kitchen filled with light)
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Eameses Influence

Visual Graphc - 'Chairs by #Eames' illustrated by Weavers Of South Sea
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Charles and Bernice “Ray” Eames were the ultimate designer power couple. Together, they created a revolutionary change in furniture design.

Charles, an architect trained at Washington University at St. Louis, moved to Michigan in 1938 to become a teacher and head of the industrial design department Cranbrook Academy of Art. It was there that he met “Ray” Kaiser, an abstract artist and colleague at Cranbrook, who helped him develop the molded plywood technique that is the key to the Eames Lounge Chair. They married in 1941.

Charles and Ray partnered on a number of projects, including the award-winning Eames House and multiple home and furniture designs. They pioneered the use of materials like fiberglass, plastic resin, and wire mesh in furniture design. The Eames Lounge Chair, though, is their most well-known work. The iteration veneration today was designed in 1956 and created primarily made out of plywood and leather. It’s sleek lines and comfortable upholstery made the chair an instant hit.

Today, Eames designs continue to influence works by both big name manufacturers and small, upscale designers alike. Charles and Ray’s firm continues to be hired for furniture design, though neither designer is still alive.

Now, you can own a piece of design history – the Eames Shell Chair was designed and created for distribution to the public. The chair comes in multiple colors and can be upholstered if desired. Another cool feature of the chair is the multiple leg options to choose from including a fun rocker style to relax. Both the lounge and shell chair are utilized today.

Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman Replica Reproduction | Best quality Eames Lounge reproduction
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Home in Amsterdam | photos by Dana van Leeuwen Follow Gravity Home: Blog - Instagram - Pinterest - Facebook - Shop
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OMG!  Why didn't I discover Eames when I was high school?  My life would've taken a totally different trajectory.                                                                                                                                                                                 More
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Modeles-chaises-eames  (comment reconnaitre originales / réédition / contrefaçon http://www.notreloft.com/8752-ou-acheter-une-chaise-eames/)
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1. The Eames Lounge and Ottoman was released in 1956. It was the first chair that the Eames designed for a high-end market. It also became part of the permanent collection at the MoMA.
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Cushions of Chair suitable for Eames Chair by PomponettiInterior
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wood, leather + texture - the perfect complements
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Small Pools for any Backyard

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Take a seat, there’s no better way to beat the heat,
                   than dipping your feet in the pool


We’ve pulled away the wool, soon there’ll be no school, 
                   the days are no longer cool, 

                                      but the water is just right


Turn on the grill, take a bite, a mouth full of delight,
                  blue serenity in sight, 

                                      now it’s time to take a dip


Jump and skip, games of showmanship, a challenging quip, 
                   lets not just slip

                                                 but dive into summer

                                                                        

Summer is approaching fast, and there is no better way to spend your summer days than by a pool! And any backyard, no matter how small, can fit a pool. Here’s a collection of small sized pools to fit even the tightest of backyard spaces. You can thank us later!

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Industry Ed with Richard: Beaded, Shiplap, Flush, and Chamfered Boards

Today, I thought it would be a good idea to talk about the different types of wood plank paneling clients are requesting in their homes. Joanna and Chip Gaines of Fixer Upper are largely responsible for the current popularity of wood plank paneling, although it has existed for many years. There are four main types of paneling that I use, each with their own distinctive look: beaded board, shiplap, flush board, and chamfered board. Knowing more about each one can help you and your client get the look they want.

Beaded Board

  • tongue-in-groove boards that lock together with a male/female joint
  • have a distinctive appearance that was very popular in the early 1900s
  • vary in width, but usually come in 2″, 4″, 6″, and 8″ widths
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Richard’s Note: 

This option was used plenty before the invention of sheet goods such as plywood and drywall. It can look nice, but it can also look very busy. I use it sparingly in my projects.

Shiplap 


  • currently, the most popular plank paneling option 
  • joints overlap opposite joints
  • easy to install  
  • mainly 6″ width, but come in 4″ and 8″ available as well 

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Richard’s Note: 

This look is really popular right now and can look good, but it has the potential to be rough-looking, since the ends do not lock together like with tongue-in-groove applications. However, that also might be the look you’re trying to achieve. Its just something to keep in mind.

Flush Board 

  • tongue-in-groove, like beaded boards, but have no beads
  • creates a smooth, clean appearance 
  • spacers can be added to break up the appearance

From our French Quarter project. See more pictures on Houzz.

Richard’s Note: 

Gives you a great look with a clean application since the ends lock together. This is my favorite of the paneling options, and, the wider, the better. Flush board on a ceiling or horizontal on a wall is an outstanding look that will never go out of style.

Chamfered Board

  • tongue-in-groove boards with chamfers (angled cuts) 
  • create a V-groove after application 
  • come in 4″, 6″, 8″, 10,” and 12″ widths

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Richard’s Note: 

These look very similar to flush board, but they have a chamfer on each edge. It is a very good lo
ok, but it sometimes adds detail that may be very busy for some of us.

As we see on Fixer Upper with Chip and Joanna Gaines, wood plank paneling is very popular. Many of these boards are reclaimed or reshaped from reclaimed materials, which have great character. The old patina looks very nice and works well with several different aesthetics.

If you or your client decide to go with real wood, you should expect some shrinking, warping, or cupping over the years. This can add character, but it can also create an unsightly finish. Engineered products are now being used that have great stability.

That being said, wood is still the most popular choice in this application. And stained woods can look very good as paneling. Let’s not forget the beauty of wood.

Rug Sizes, Placements, & Positions

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The toughest part of picking a rug is figuring out the size you need. There are a few conventional rules that most people follow. It is important to consider the scale of your room and the placement of furniture around the rug. When in doubt, a great rule of thumb is bigger is better. World Market’s Blog has a couple of useful diagrams that can help you visualize size and placement: 
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Starting from there, you can further your space with a good use of all design elements: balance, unity/harmony, scale, color, texture, space, and form. A combination of these will create the ultimate balanced and harmonic space.

When considering a rug, it is perfectly fine to break away from convention. Just consider the design elements. The color, pattern, and texture can affect the presence the rug has in a room. A bolder rug may actually feel larger than it actually is, if paired with cleaner lines and design elements. If the rug is more monochromatic, you will probably need a much larger rug to make it feel big enough for the space. In short, visual weight is more important than actual size.

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When picking a pattern or color or texture, consider the other objects in the room and how the rug will contribute to the design elements. Contrast is always good. A lighter shade rug works with dark walls and vice versa. If you are missing some texture or color in your room, your rug is a good way to add it.

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As humans, we have a need to find order. You might think straight is orderly, but the rug above demonstrates otherwise. Balance is not always created with symmetry. We are loving the way this rug is turned “crooked”. It’s bold color and adventurous position provide a powerful draw to to this room.

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Love a rug, but know it just isn’t big enough for your room? Not to worry – just layer up! This is a great way to incorporate more texture or color.

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One convention that we are often afraid to break away from is using a round rug with something other than a round table. It is possible. The scale of this rug works great with the furniture and layout of the room, as well as the colors!

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Smaller rugs are great for grouping areas of a room. In the above example, the designer created a visual space for this dining set. She also layered rugs with different textures and patterns for great contrast.
Need more inspiration? See rug examples that help balance each space, broken up by rooms:

1. Foyer

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 This foyer has a great use of contrast as well as complimentary colors. See our past blog on use of Complimentary Colors!

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This rug adds a fantastic directional pattern. (That puppy though!)  Read more from a past blog on Foyers that Make an Impression!

2. Kitchen

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3. Dining

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Check out that table! Our Trend Alert this month is Live Edge Wood. Be sure to read all about it!

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4. Living
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4. Bedroom
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We love this placement of a bedroom rug! Instead of centering it to the bed itself, let it flank the bed.

5. Bathroom

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